Jasper Zehetgruber __ architectural research cv email   about  
Analog Anthology
2022

The contemporary human understanding of reality is defined by a process of fragmentation and categorisation: Human vs. nature, female vs. male, good vs. evil, national vs. foreign, local vs. global. Ultimately this leans towards the essentialist binary of digital computation: 1 vs. 0. Ants perceive differently, they make sense of the world by communicating through pheromone gradients. Avoiding categorisation, this method of sensemaking is comparable to an analog computer, operating analogously to the fluctuating gradients of reality instead of digitally separating it into distinct elements. ‘Analog Anthology’ is a phygital, audiovisual archive exploring the hopes and risks of gradient-based mapping, sensemaking, and computation. It is accessible through an interactive sculpture, which allows the visitor to control the movement of a projection, containing the archival audiovisual data (see below).

Analog Anthology
Analog Anthology
Analog Anthology

The curtain is an architectural element which is less absolute than a wall. It does not imply a one or a zero or the possibility of a clearly divided map, but suggests an unknown space.

Analog Anthology
Analog Anthology
Interface created with: Unity and Arduino using the Uduino plugin
Weaving Worlds: Mapping and biological research for Analog Anthology The map which signifies the powerstructures of the information-age is the IP address space. The case study 'Weaving Worlds' investigates collage-based construction behaviours and gradient-based communication methods of the weaver ant Oecophylla to explore non-binary methods of understanding and mapping the internet. Collages are a common tool to imagine alternative realities, such as through the psychogeographical maps of the Situationists in the 1950s. Weaver ants construct their nests by creating three-dimensional leaf collages. How would a Superorganism such as a weaver ant colony imagine a map of the internet?
Analog Anthology
Analog Anthology

Every device connected to the internet needs an IP address to be individually addressable. An IPv4 address consists of four numbers ranging from 0 to 255 (e.g. 128.9.28.9). This allows for approx. four billion individual addresses. The complete IPv4 address space can be visualised through a schematic square map as seen above. Each pixel in the original 4096 x 4096 pixel image represents 256 IPv4 addresses and is colored according to the geolocation of the connected devices. The difference in quantity between the colors visualizes power imbalances in access to information resources accross the globe.

Analog Anthology Analog Anthology
Analog Anthology Analog Anthology
Credits A project by Jasper Zehetgruber in collaboration with: Joachim Offenberg, myrmecologist and weaver ant specialist at Aarhus University Tutors: Nancy Diniz, Course Leader Alice Taylor, Lecturer in Biology and Living Systems Victoria Geaney, Associate Lecturer Design Studios Oscar Villareal, Associate Lecturer Interdisciplinary Studios Timotej Baca, Associate Lecturer, Visual Narratives Alejandro Luna, Associate Lecturer Sustainability Innovation Thomas Bugg, Graduate Teaching Assistant Paula Camina Eiras, Graduate Teaching Assistant